Thursday, March 29, 2012

Spring Cleaning... and Junkin'


I cannot tell you (though I know you felt it, too) the absolute JOY I felt when the temperatures finally came up, the sun came out and I was able to open up our home and let the fresh, warm air and the beautiful birdsong indoors. Talk about feeling like a new woman --- in fact, I felt downright girlish!

Thankfully, I didn't feel too guilty being outside and enjoying the beautiful day because we'd started our spring cleaning already and managed to clear out some storage space. By donating clothes, reorganizing things like the the craft supplies and even the spice cabinet and implementing a few new organizational tools, we were ready to welcome spring with open, less cluttered hearts. It makes such a difference.

In our beautiful April issue, dubbed The Spring Issue on the cover, there are pages and pages of ideas on how to refresh your life, your home and even your finances and enjoy the experience of living a less cluttered life.

See Clutter Control by Mary Wallace on page 43 for an interesting concept on how clutter affects your chakras.
On page 40, Lesley Fix will go over "5 key categories" to help you prioritize and organize your finances in Financial Focus. Knowing that you are the right path to keeping your finances in order is essential to enjoying the little things in life fully.

And if you're looking for fresh inspiration for your spring wardrobe or your home, the April issue will get your creative juices flowing. The Prairie Sisters (page 84) will encourage you to look again at old pieces of furniture or even a vintage radio in a new light - by giving it new life.
And Fashion Trendcast, on page 10, reinforces the knowledge that you don't have to break the bank to freshen up your wardrobe and look like a million bucks. The fashion layout, outfitted by Magpie's Chic Consignment Boutique, is lovely and bright with affordable spring fashions.

So kick up your heels and treat yourself to a lovely ode to spring - I guarantee it will brighten your day!












Thursday, March 22, 2012

Real Food Revival



GROWING IN CONTAINERS

By Amy Grisak

Even on a patio or the balcony of an apartment, you can successfully grow a wonderment of fruits, herbs and vegetables in containers. Strawberries, herbs, tomatoes, potatoes, and even corn are a possible as long as you follow a few guidelines.

Pick generously sized containers. Yes, it’s easier to move small pots, but plants quickly outgrow the space, which limits production. But keep in mind, even if you’re using large containers, it doesn’t mean you have to fill the entire thing with potting mix. Invert a gallon size, or larger, pot at the bottom to take up space and keep the weight a little bit lighter.

Make sure you have adequate drainage. There’s no need to place gravel in the bottom of the container, as was once a common practice. It creates a false drainage point, and can result in weaker roots at the bottom and potential root suffocation. You want the excess water to flow through freely. Watering is critical to a successful container garden, and you need to be diligent throughout the summer to ensure a successful crop. If it’s super hot you have to water twice a day to keep plants from wilting.

Use a potting mix, not garden soil. Garden soil is heavy, and can have fungal or disease issues that are intensified in a container situation. You can use a standard bagged potting soil, or create your own with equal parts of peat moss, vermiculite (which is all tested to be sure it’s asbestos free) and compost. This is light enough that it allows water to drain, yet is rich in nutrients.

Don’t forget to feed your plants since frequent watering washes out the nutrients. Either use a time released granular fertilizer, or a liquid fertilizer that you apply every 7 to 10 days. You can also use a fish emulsion or compost tea if you prefer a more natural approach.

And when you plant, give your plants a fair amount of space. Although the requirements for spacing aren’t necessarily the same as on the back of the seed packet or plant tag, you do have to give them enough room to spread out. For example, plant corn 4 inches apart in a ring around the pot. You can do a companion planting with pole beans – the second component of the “Three Sisters” combination of corn, beans and squash – since they use different levels of nutrients, and actually bring nitrogen to the equation.

Tomatoes really need a container of their own, and it should be at least as big as a 5 gallon bucket. Bigger is actually better. Also look for determinant varieties because they will grow to a certain height instead of continually reaching and vining all over your patio.

It’s the same with potatoes. Fill the bottom of the good-size container with 4 inches of potting mix, plant a few seed potatoes, and then cover them with 3 to 4 inches of additional potting mix. Once the potatoes sprout and grow roughly 5 to 6 inches tall, add more potting mix so only an inch of the plant is showing. As they grow, continue adding more soil. The potatoes develop above the initial seed potatoes, so the more layers of potting mix you can add, the more potatoes you will have.

When you’re planting several plants in the same container, try to group them according to light and water requirements. For instance, basil, parsley and thyme grow very well together since they all need ample sunlight and consistent watering. On the other hand, if you include lettuce with these herbs, it will suffer in the heat while they all will thrive.

Not everyone has an ideal gardening spot in their backyard to grow fresh veggies for their family, but anyone can grow fruits, vegetables or herbs in containers. So grab a pot and grow those veggies.

One of Amy’s first culinary experiments was unsuccessfully trying to talk her siblings into eating creamed dandelion leaves. Since those early attempts, she has learned the art of cooking in quantity at the Izaak Walton Inn, and created surprising dishes using herbs and edible flowers at her former herb farm. Now her culinary and gardening adventures are chronicled on http://www.thebackyardbounty.com

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Keepin' It Real

This morning we had a water cooler discussion about the diversity of women we want Montana Women to reach. We've all had the discussion about the models, in all their air brushed glory, who grace the covers and pages of the magazines you can find in the grocery store checkout lines. Montana Woman prides itself on featuring and celebrating women of all ages and walks of life and presenting information in each issue that any woman, aged 18 to 118, can pick up and relate to. We are not about editing out imperfections and encouraging you to obtain flawless beauty. We hope to highlight the strength and courage that comes from being true to one's self while finding beauty in our surroundings and everyday, real lives.

You may notice that we don't cover world news or the negative (yet very real) issues that affect our community. We are not turning a blind eye to those stories, however, there are many, many resources to turn to for the latest in current events, locally and world wide. In the effort to provide a publication that is both meaningful and informative, we want our readers to know that when you sit down to enjoy a few quiet minutes of reading, what you will find will uplift and empower you, and restore your belief that your efforts, however big or small are making a difference for the better.

We are, as they say, about "keepin' it real" at Montana Woman. We hope it shows!



There is REAL beauty in everyday women and in everyday life

Thursday, March 8, 2012

What Women Want






GARY BURTON HAIR PRODUCTIONS

By Cindy O’Boyle

Gary Burton loves women. It’s obvious from the moment you sit down in his chair and he begins discussing cuts, colors, and styles. The next thing you notice is his ability to hear what you are saying. Sound strange? Actually, it’s more unique than strange. The reason? He listens… really listens to what women want and then does everything in his power to create the hairstyle of their dreams.

Gary comes from a family of hairstylists. His father, Lou Burton, became involved in women’s hair styling after he was hurt in a mining accident in 1951. Lou went to beauty school in Butte in 1955, earning the distinction of being their first male student. Immediately after graduating he opened a salon in Dillon, Montana. He later moved to Missoula and opened a salon in 1962 where he spent the remainder of his days doing what he loved – hair! Gary’s mother, Juanita, was a housewife but was anxious to try her hand at hair design as well. She was a stylist for 30 years before retiring to her beloved farm in Whitehall, Montana.

Gary bought his first salon in 1968 in downtown Missoula. In 1979 he moved to Kalispell for two years where he enjoyed owning a busy salon. His life journey then took him to Helena and eventually back to Missoula where he opened another successful salon. In 2010, Gary returned to Kalispell and opened a one chair salon he named Gary Burton Hair Productions.

Gary shared, “My journey as a hair stylist started when I was 16 years old. I have never thought about doing anything else. I have been a licensed cosmetologist since 1965 and for the past years he has had the pleasure of ‘decorating other men’s desserts!’ I also spent 20 years with the Montana Hair Fashion Committee as an educator. I enjoy hair competition and have won awards in Washington, Idaho and Montana. My awards were in day, evening and cocktail styles. It was only natural for me to move from competing to judging the competitions, and for over 20 years I helped run competitions as part of the Montana Hair Fashion Committee.

“After working with women’s hair for all these decades, you would think I know women – WRONG! I believe if you feel good about yourself you should share it with the ones you love. If I can help a woman feel better about her appearance, then I have accomplished my mission. My hope is that she will share her happiness with others.

“I would say that styling women’s hair has kept me busy over the years, first learning the industry and then growing up in the competition arena to being an educator and platform artist. For the past 15 years I have styled hair for productions ranging from theatre plays to film and commercial shoots. I sincerely enjoy working with runway fashion shows and photo shoots.”

Gary has worked with the University of Montana Arts and Media Department where he enjoys his time spent with students in the drama, arts and media departments. “The energy on set is amazing. I truly like working with students who are pursuing their dreams. They help keep my career fun and fresh!”

The Missoula Children’s Theater was a part of Gary’s life for over 15 years. He designed hair for numerous productions including Guys and Dolls, Grease, The Rocky Horror Show and Annie. “Probably one of the most unique productions I did hair for was Cats. I was given 30 human hair wigs and 30 pictures of the characters. It was my job to cut and style the wigs to look like fur. They were then sprayed to match the color of the costume for each cat. It was a challenge, but one I gladly embraced.”

Gary has also worked with Flathead Valley Community College in the production of Evita. He looks forward to helping with many more productions in the Flathead community.

Trends in fashion and hair styles go hand-in-hand. Gary has helped with many fashion fundraisers over the years that benefit women, including the Bra Show which is now known as the Off the Rack Fashion Show in Missoula. The show benefits the Blue Mountain Clinic that offers services and counseling for women. The Flathead Valley’s first Women’s Expo had models sporting Burton’s “dos”. The Expo raised funds for The Crisis Line, Teens ‘N Crisis and The Montana Woman Foundation Scholarship Fund. “I want to help my community any way I can. Over the years women have blessed me with a way to make a living; now it is my turn to return the favor.”

“In an article titled ‘Hard Hat Turned Hairdresser’ published in The Missoulian in 1982, my father said, ‘Through the years I have discovered there are few people more interesting than the typical housewife. A housewife spends most of her life at home with the kids, and rarely has the opportunity to have a conversation with an adult. I am often asked what I find to visit with women about. I laugh because I always find millions of things to talk about. And I feel it is my responsibility to make the customer feel better. This is not a business thing, but a human thing.’ My father not only taught me the art of hair dressing; he also instilled in me the human part of the business. Having worked with women’s hair all these years I have seen women take on more than housewives of the past. They are often overly stressed trying to accomplish a million things in a 24 hour period. I like to help them relax and forget their ‘to do’ list when they sit in my chair. I like to pamper them, make them laugh and feel good about themselves.”

It seems appropriate that Gary would be blessed with three daughters. His love for his trade has been passed down to yet another Burton generation. Daughter Angel owns Burton’s Classic in Missoula and Krista works at Angel’s salon as well. Brandy lives in Portland.

When asked about the changes in the hair industry over the years, Gary said, “In the 1960’s the fashion was hard hair. By that I mean women would come in once a week to have their hair done. I would style, back comb and then spray their hair. I mean SPRAY their hair. Clients would sleep on silk pillowcases and in hair nets – anything not to disturb the hair. They would return the following week to have their hair reset. I would brush the hair and hair spray out before I shampooed it. During those days so much product was used that the hair had to be shampooed twice. Some clients would come in the middle of the week to have their hair combed out and then reshaped.

“It was not unusual for my salon to go through four cases of hairspray in a month. That was 100 cans of spray being used by 10 stylists. It was called hard hair for a reason! Today I probably go through a can of hairspray about every two weeks. With today’s soft look there is no need for the use of as much product. Plus today women tend to wash their hair daily. Women are more casual about their hair.

“The 70’s started a 25 year rage for bobs, wedges and a more natural look. Today we have gone back to the soft, edgy look that is a bit messier, but very casual. Hairstyles always make a full circle.

“It’s hard to predict what the upcoming year in hair style will bring. A lot of it depends on the styles coming out of Hollywood. Often styles are guided by a popular actress or public figure. An example of that would be the bob that Princess Diana sported and the long shag that Jennifer Aniston made popular. I personally think that we will be returning to use of hot rollers and curling barrels just to get a different finish to the hair. The style will still be a soft flowing style, but will have a more finished look.”

Gary has styled hair for Montana Woman Magazine covers for the past year. “I am excited to be working with Cindy and Montana Woman as the magazine hair stylist. I met Cindy through my life partner, Hollis. Cindy and I immediately connected through a common passion for helping women. I am happy to be part of a magazine that is designed to enrich women’s lives. I also look forward to working with the Montana Woman Foundation in their endeavors to help women reach their goals and dreams. Not only are the magazine and foundation well respected resources for women, they also actively try to improve Montana communities – I want to be a part of that!





What Women Want

GARY BURTON HAIR PRODUCTIONS

By Cindy O’Boyle

Gary Burton loves women. It’s obvious from the moment you sit down in his chair and he begins discussing cuts, colors, and styles. The next thing you notice is his ability to hear what you are saying. Sound strange? Actually, it’s more unique than strange. The reason? He listens… really listens to what women want and then does everything in his power to create the hairstyle of their dreams.

Gary comes from a family of hairstylists. His father, Lou Burton, became involved in women’s hair styling after he was hurt in a mining accident in 1951. Lou went to beauty school in Butte in 1955, earning the distinction of being their first male student. Immediately after graduating he opened a salon in Dillon, Montana. He later moved to Missoula and opened a salon in 1962 where he spent the remainder of his days doing what he loved – hair! Gary’s mother, Juanita, was a housewife but was anxious to try her hand at hair design as well. She was a stylist for 30 years before retiring to her beloved farm in Whitehall, Montana.

Gary bought his first salon in 1968 in downtown Missoula. In 1979 he moved to Kalispell for two years where he enjoyed owning a busy salon. His life journey then took him to Helena and eventually back to Missoula where he opened another successful salon. In 2010, Gary returned to Kalispell and opened a one chair salon he named Gary Burton Hair Productions.

Gary shared, “My journey as a hair stylist started when I was 16 years old. I have never thought about doing anything else. I have been a licensed cosmetologist since 1965 and for the past years he has had the pleasure of ‘decorating other men’s desserts!’ I also spent 20 years with the Montana Hair Fashion Committee as an educator. I enjoy hair competition and have won awards in Washington, Idaho and Montana. My awards were in day, evening and cocktail styles. It was only natural for me to move from competing to judging the competitions, and for over 20 years I helped run competitions as part of the Montana Hair Fashion Committee.

“After working with women’s hair for all these decades, you would think I know women – WRONG! I believe if you feel good about yourself you should share it with the ones you love. If I can help a woman feel better about her appearance, then I have accomplished my mission. My hope is that she will share her happiness with others.

“I would say that styling women’s hair has kept me busy over the years, first learning the industry and then growing up in the competition arena to being an educator and platform artist. For the past 15 years I have styled hair for productions ranging from theatre plays to film and commercial shoots. I sincerely enjoy working with runway fashion shows and photo shoots.”

Gary has worked with the University of Montana Arts and Media Department where he enjoys his time spent with students in the drama, arts and media departments. “The energy on set is amazing. I truly like working with students who are pursuing their dreams. They help keep my career fun and fresh!”

The Missoula Children’s Theater was a part of Gary’s life for over 15 years. He designed hair for numerous productions including Guys and Dolls, Grease, The Rocky Horror Show and Annie. “Probably one of the most unique productions I did hair for was Cats. I was given 30 human hair wigs and 30 pictures of the characters. It was my job to cut and style the wigs to look like fur. They were then sprayed to match the color of the costume for each cat. It was a challenge, but one I gladly embraced.”

Gary has also worked with Flathead Valley Community College in the production of Evita. He looks forward to helping with many more productions in the Flathead community.

Trends in fashion and hair styles go hand-in-hand. Gary has helped with many fashion fundraisers over the years that benefit women, including the Bra Show which is now known as the Off the Rack Fashion Show in Missoula. The show benefits the Blue Mountain Clinic that offers services and counseling for women. The Flathead Valley’s first Women’s Expo had models sporting Burton’s “dos”. The Expo raised funds for The Crisis Line, Teens ‘N Crisis and The Montana Woman Foundation Scholarship Fund. “I want to help my community any way I can. Over the years women have blessed me with a way to make a living; now it is my turn to return the favor.”

“In an article titled ‘Hard Hat Turned Hairdresser’ published in The Missoulian in 1982, my father said, ‘Through the years I have discovered there are few people more interesting than the typical housewife. A housewife spends most of her life at home with the kids, and rarely has the opportunity to have a conversation with an adult. I am often asked what I find to visit with women about. I laugh because I always find millions of things to talk about. And I feel it is my responsibility to make the customer feel better. This is not a business thing, but a human thing.’ My father not only taught me the art of hair dressing; he also instilled in me the human part of the business. Having worked with women’s hair all these years I have seen women take on more than housewives of the past. They are often overly stressed trying to accomplish a million things in a 24 hour period. I like to help them relax and forget their ‘to do’ list when they sit in my chair. I like to pamper them, make them laugh and feel good about themselves.”

It seems appropriate that Gary would be blessed with three daughters. His love for his trade has been passed down to yet another Burton generation. Daughter Angel owns Burton’s Classic in Missoula and Krista works at Angel’s salon as well. Brandy lives in Portland.

When asked about the changes in the hair industry over the years, Gary said, “In the 1960’s the fashion was hard hair. By that I mean women would come in once a week to have their hair done. I would style, back comb and then spray their hair. I mean SPRAY their hair. Clients would sleep on silk pillowcases and in hair nets – anything not to disturb the hair. They would return the following week to have their hair reset. I would brush the hair and hair spray out before I shampooed it. During those days so much product was used that the hair had to be shampooed twice. Some clients would come in the middle of the week to have their hair combed out and then reshaped.

“It was not unusual for my salon to go through four cases of hairspray in a month. That was 100 cans of spray being used by 10 stylists. It was called hard hair for a reason! Today I probably go through a can of hairspray about every two weeks. With today’s soft look there is no need for the use of as much product. Plus today women tend to wash their hair daily. Women are more casual about their hair.

“The 70’s started a 25 year rage for bobs, wedges and a more natural look. Today we have gone back to the soft, edgy look that is a bit messier, but very casual. Hairstyles always make a full circle.

“It’s hard to predict what the upcoming year in hair style will bring. A lot of it depends on the styles coming out of Hollywood. Often styles are guided by a popular actress or public figure. An example of that would be the bob that Princess Diana sported and the long shag that Jennifer Aniston made popular. I personally think that we will be returning to use of hot rollers and curling barrels just to get a different finish to the hair. The style will still be a soft flowing style, but will have a more finished look.”

Gary has styled hair for Montana Woman Magazine covers for the past year. “I am excited to be working with Cindy and Montana Woman as the magazine hair stylist. I met Cindy through my life partner, Hollis. Cindy and I immediately connected through a common passion for helping women. I am happy to be part of a magazine that is designed to enrich women’s lives. I also look forward to working with the Montana Woman Foundation in their endeavors to help women reach their goals and dreams. Not only are the magazine and foundation well respected resources for women, they also actively try to improve Montana communities – I want to be a part of that!

To set up your appointment give Gary a call at: 406-240-6590